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Mistakes on Writing Tests

Sometimes, while the writing might not be bad, it shows some signs of sloppiness that betrays how much effort was put in proofreading.

For example, take a grammar test from the same company that wrote the worksheet in my last grammar post. It's an overall review. A couple of mistakes popped out though. Not as major or awkward than the ones on the worksheet (since tests probably have better proofreaders), but....

For instance, this sentence appears in the instructions of one of the sections: "A student wrote this paragraph about a storm."

Name of paragraph? "My Dog"
No storms in there. I wonder what made them which the old paragraph out and forget to fix it.

Another one is more of a minor nitpick on my part, but I think it's worth mentioning:
I inched my way toward the bird, and then I saw the problem: its feet were caught in a tangle of plastic--one of those plastic bags from a grocery store.
Now the sentence itself is all right. In fact, I would say its the kind you would find in a novel or short story, if the author desires this kind of pace. But I question whatever the word "plastic" needs to be used twice. Hmm...
I inched my way toward the bird, and then I saw the problem: its feet were caught in a tangle of plastic--one of those bags from a grocery store.
or:
I inched my way toward the bird, and then I saw the problem: its feet were caught in a tangle--one of those plastic bags from a grocery store.
What would you say? Again, all nitpicky, but it's a good revising exercise.

Now, this test would've made me question the publisher's merits with the phrase "Canada Goose", until I let Almighty Google indicate that that's their name. And it's also the name of a company that sells coats.

...Wait a minute, did the test said the correct answer was "Canada Goose", or "Canada goose"?

If they said the latter, I might have a case. I bet there's at least one writer out there who argues against the current way of teaching grammar. Remember how they taught you not use sentence fragments? Or to not use split infinitives?

ONE MORE THING:


Guess what mistake I spotted on an another test from another company recently?

Effect/affect being mixed up.

I don't have the exact quote (since I lost the piece of paper I wrote it down on), but I think it's safe to conclude that such companies--ironically--don't have the best proof-readers.